What is Orthosomnia?

What is Orthosomnia

What is Orthosomnia

Do you find yourself spending more time worrying about your sleep, from the quality to the amount of it? Do you track precisely how long you sleep and the efficiency of that sleep? If so, you may be experiencing what’s known as orthodontia.

The term “orthosomnia” is a relatively new word, first coined in 2016 by a physician. It combines “ortho,” which is derived from the Greek word for “right,” with “somnus,” which is derived from the Latin word for “sleep.” Put together, orthodontia means insomnia due to excessive tracking or obsession with one’s sleep.

Orthosomnia describes a condition where people become so preoccupied with trying to optimize their sleep that they cause more harm than good. In this article, we explore Orthosomnia in detail – what causes it and how it can affect your life and health negatively.

 What Is Orthosomnia? Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Orthosomnia is a condition caused by the increased focus on optimizing biometric data collected from wearable technology. This can lead to an obsession with sleep and trying to exert control over it, resulting in increased anxiety and insomnia due to unhelpful changes in sleep patterns. People with perfectionist qualities and anxiety are more prone to developing orthodontia, as they may become fixated on arbitrary numbers of hours of sleep they think they need. Orthosomnia is the idea of perfect sleep and feeling great all the time, but achieving this perfect sleep is not realistic for a normal healthy sleeper. Waking up without an alarm does not happen all the time, which can be frustrating for those suffering from orthodontia.

Treatment for orthosomnia includes reducing the amount of time spent analyzing biometric data, as well as cognitive behavioral therapy and relaxation techniques. It is important to recognize that there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to treating orthosomnia; the best approach is to find a combination of treatments that work for the individual. Additionally, it is important to recognize that sleep-tracking technology can be beneficial in some cases, such as helping people with insomnia or other sleep disorders. However, it should not be used as a tool to obsess over and control one’s sleep.

What is orthodontia?

Orthosomnia is a new type of sleep problem caused by the influx of digital sleep trackers and apps. It is not yet officially recognized as a disorder, but it is characterized by people becoming so dependent on their devices that they struggle to sleep. People with orthosomnia may spend countless hours thinking exhaustively about how they cannot optimize their nightly rest. Symptoms associated with orthosomnia include difficulty sleeping, waking up too early, fatigue, and poor concentration. Orthosomnia can worsen sleep as people attempt to make changes to optimize their sleep score.

To manage orthosomnia, it is recommended to gradually disengage from sleep trackers, establish good sleep hygiene habits, and participate in cognitive behavior therapy if needed. This includes avoiding screens before bedtime, creating a relaxing bedtime routine, and avoiding caffeine or alcohol late in the day. Additionally, it is important to listen to your body’s needs rather than relying solely on data from a device or app.

What is Orthosomnia

Symptoms

Sleep disturbances are a common symptom of many medical and psychological conditions. Difficulty nodding off and staying asleep, waking up too early, and feeling unrefreshed after sleep are all signs of a potential sleep disorder. Anxiety, depression, irritability, fatigue, and poor concentration/attention can also be associated with sleep disturbances. These symptoms can lead to an increased risk of errors/accidents, malaise, and increased pain.

It is important to note that an obsessive focus on improving sleep may worsen the quality of sleep. This is because it increases anxiety levels which can make it more difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep. Additionally, it can lead to feelings of guilt or frustration if the desired results are not achieved quickly enough. It is important to take steps to improve your sleeping habits without becoming overly focused on them in order to achieve the best possible outcome.

Causes

The use of biometric data from wearable devices to measure sleep has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, there are several limitations that must be taken into account when using these devices. Firstly, the accuracy of the sleep metrics is dependent on the device being validated against gold-standard testing within sleep medicine. Without this validation, it is difficult to ascertain how accurate the device is in measuring sleep stages and identifying brief periods of wakefulness after sleep onset. Additionally, some metrics may be manipulated or not correspond to established sleep science, potentially missing important information such as breathing difficulties or abnormal movements or behaviors.

In order to ensure the accuracy and reliability of data collected from wearable devices, rigorous scientific evaluation and external validation studies should be conducted. This will help to ensure that the device is providing accurate information about a person’s sleep patterns and can identify any potential issues that may arise during their restful hours. Furthermore, it is important for users to understand the limitations of these devices so they can make informed decisions about their sleep health.

Orthosomnia is a term used to describe an unhealthy obsession with achieving perfect sleep through the use of wearable technology and tracking devices. It is characterized by an excessive focus on optimizing sleep, often leading to anxiety and feelings of guilt or frustration if the desired results are not achieved quickly enough. Orthosomnia can lead to disturbed sleep patterns, fatigue, poor concentration, and irritability. It is important to take steps to improve your sleeping habits without becoming overly focused on them in order to achieve the best possible outcome.

What is Orthosomnia

Why Is Orthosomnia A Problem?

Orthosomnia is a problem caused by people obsessing over their sleep habits and trying to exert control over them. People with perfectionist qualities or anxiety are more prone to developing orthosomnia, which can lead to them becoming fixated on arbitrary numbers they think they need to hit in order to get enough sleep. This unrealistic expectation can cause anxiety and stress around sleeping, which can be detrimental to overall health.

Sleep trackers are not always accurate, and screens emit light that can disrupt melatonin production. It is recommended to keep phones and laptops away from the bed in order to avoid disruptions to sleep. DoctorNDTV is a great resource for those looking for credible health news and tips on healthy living, diet plans, and informative videos. It has a panel of over 350 experts who help develop content and bring the latest in healthcare information. With this knowledge, individuals can make informed decisions about their own health and well-being, including how best to manage their sleep patterns without falling into the trap of orthosomnia.

In addition to avoiding screens and tracking devices, it is important to practice good sleep hygiene. This includes establishing a regular bedtime routine, avoiding caffeine and alcohol before bed, and exercising regularly. It is also important to create a comfortable sleep environment that is dark, quiet, and cool. Taking steps such as these can help improve overall sleep quality without becoming overly focused on achieving perfect sleep.

How is Orthosomnia Diagnosed?

Orthosomnia is not a formally recognized sleep disorder, but doctors may recognize signs of it while evaluating a person for sleep problems. Signs of orthosomnia include an exaggerated trust in sleep tracker data and an intense focus on achieving perfect sleep as measured by the tracker. Unfortunately, there are no established criteria for diagnosing orthosomnia, so diagnosis can be difficult. A thorough evaluation by a qualified professional such as a certified sleep coach or doctor may be necessary to diagnose orthosomnia.

The signs of orthosomnia include a radical reliance on sleep tracker data and a strong preoccupation with achieving perfect sleep. People with orthosomnia may become overly focused on their sleeping patterns and obsess over minor changes in their data that could indicate poor quality of sleep. They may also become anxious if they don’t meet their own expectations for how much they should be sleeping each night. If left untreated, this obsession can lead to further issues such as insomnia or depression. It is important to seek professional help if you think you may be suffering from orthosomnia.

What is Orthosomnia

How Can You Help Orthosomnia?

Orthosomnia is a condition where people become overly obsessed with tracking their sleep. This can lead to anxiety and depression, as well as an inability to get the restful sleep they need. Fortunately, there are ways to help those suffering from orthosomnia. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTI) is one of the most effective treatments for this condition. CBTI helps identify and improve sleep disorders, as well as treat other psychiatric disorders like anxiety and depression. Additionally, it’s important to remember that sleep trackers are not entirely accurate and take the information with a grain of salt.

Other helpful tips include getting healthy sunlight exposure daily, practicing yoga or meditation, reducing screen time before bed, incorporating pro-sleep foods into your daily nutrition intake, staying hydrated, establishing a calming bedtime ritual, inviting a creative or supportive outlet to process emotions, and maintaining a consistent bed routine with room for flexibility. Taking a break from your tracker and trying to keep a sleep diary can also be beneficial.

It is also important to remember that sleep trackers are not a substitute for professional help. If you think you may be suffering from orthosomnia, it is important to seek help from a qualified professional such as a certified sleep coach or doctor. They can provide personalized advice and treatment options that are tailored to your individual needs. Additionally, they can help you develop healthy habits and routines that will improve your overall sleep quality.

Conclusion

In conclusion, orthosomnia is a condition where people become overly obsessed with tracking their sleep. This can lead to anxiety and depression, as well as an inability to get the restful sleep they need. Fortunately, there are ways to help those suffering from orthosomnia such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTI), healthy sunlight exposure, practicing yoga or meditation, reducing screen time before bed, incorporating pro-sleep foods into your daily nutrition intake, staying hydrated, establishing a calming bedtime ritual, inviting a creative or supportive outlet to process emotions, and maintaining a consistent bed routine with room for flexibility.

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